Square Diner — 75.3 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Located in Tribeca, Square Diner is a “classic a train-car diner” with a roof plopped on top.  Once inside, you can see its classic shape by looking up at the curved wooden ceiling.  Not only is the ceiling attractive, but we think its shape helps to diffuse sound.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

The interior is fairly small and narrow, and every square inch is used. With the exception of the ceiling, most of the other materials in the space are hard, reflective surfaces–glass, tile, and metal. The kitchen is somewhat exposed to the dining space, as there is a short order window behind the counter and a door to kitchen was propped open.  Fortunately kitchen sounds weren’t a problem during our visit. Unfortunately, background music was playing which served no purpose other than to annoy. Featuring 80’s hits–a perennial favorite–all it did was add an unnecessary layer of noise. If the music was turned off, we think the reading would have been below 73 dBC.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Still, the soundscape was definitely manageable, even with a fairly full house of chatty customers.  Without the music, we think it could have been close to comfortable. That said, the space didn’t feel too live, but since Square Diner is small, be advised that one or two loud people could easily dominate the soundscape.

No surprise that Square Diner offers a long menu of diner classics. The food is fine for what it is–Joe Jr’s has the city’s best diner burger, while this one was perfectly acceptable. Diners, particularly standalone diners, are a dying breed in New York City, so if you enjoy them, this one should be on your short list. Square Diner is a good inexpensive option in otherwise expensive and loud Tribeca.

HOURS

Monday through Friday: 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday: 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Street (at the corner of Varick Street), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Square Diner

Edward’s — 73.7 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

We visited Edward’s for a quick lunch one February afternoon.  Edward’s is a neighborhood restaurant serving classic American comfort food–burgers, chicken fingers, pasta, and salads.  The place was about half full when we entered, but was a bit busier by the time we left. The front of the space has a bar to one side and tables on the other.  It is somewhat separated from back dining area by a short divider.  There are high ceilings, unfinished floors, and banquettes lining the back dining area.  Given the decor we thought we should be pretty comfortable during our meal.

But we weren’t as comfortable as we anticipated.  Why?  Guess.  Yes, once again a perfectly fine space was marred by music that was too loud.  It wasn’t horriblly loud but it was completely unnecessary.  And the problem wasn’t simply the volume, it was also the type of music that was playing–fast paced, with a horn section, absolutely not calming or relaxing.  Whoever chose the music needs to be reminded that Edward’s is  a restaurant not a club–we just wanted a meal, not a dance with a stranger.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

As a consequence, we are concerned about what the sound level is like when every table is taken. So for now, we will say the space is tolerable but it could have been better.  Edward’s might be a good spot if you are dining with children.  It looks like a kid-friendly space, and we saw a couple of moms with strollers in the front of the house.

HOURS

Sunday and Monday: 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Tuesday through Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.

LOCATION

(betw. Duane and Thomas Streets), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Edward’s

Nancy Whiskey Pub — 86.4 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

When we entered Nancy Whiskey Pub we wanted to love it.  It appears to be the perfect neighborhood dive bar–not contrived or styled, it simply is a place you go to drink with your buddies.  And we did fall in love with the place, for five, maybe ten minutes. But after our brief love affair, things quickly turned ugly when a bartender began feeding bills into the jukebox and destroyed what had been a lovely relaxed atmosphere.

No one asked the bartender to play music, so either management requires the bartenders to turn it on at a certain time or maybe she was bored.  We don’t know.  What we do know is that the volume was punishing.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

We also don’t know if deafening music is played every day or whether the bartender just wanted to hear some tunes, but when we asked if the volume could be lowered, the bartender shouted, “go upstairs,” which we understood to be “no.”

We did go upstairs and found a smaller space crammed with people who were not quite drunk and already screaming–not surprisingly, this space was only slightly quieter than below. We threw back our drinks and left, emerging onto the comparatively serene street, and continued our search for the perfect bar.

So, sadly, we must advise that you avoid Nancy Whiskey Pub if you cherish your hearing more than finding a genuine neighborhood bar. The prices were good, the physical space  was perfect, but it’s just too damn loud.

HOURS

11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. every day (sometimes close earlier on Sundays and Mondays)

LOCATION

Street (on the corner of 6th Avenue), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Nancy Whiskey Pub

 

 

Delimarie — 70.2 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Delimarie is a low-cost option in that yet unnamed area where Tribeca meets City Hall and various state and federal government buildings.  It follows the standard lunch buffet model: grab a container, pick and choose among the hot and cold options, and pay by the pound.  But Delimarie is so much better than your average deli buffet place.

Deli buffets usually offer the same choices no matter where you go, and everything looks like it was made in the same offsite industrial kitchen.  Not so at Delimarie.  The entrees and vegetables looked fresher and were tastier; the salmon was moist and tasted of salmon, not some packaged sauce.  Like most delis, Delimarie also offers sandwiches to order, and like their buffet options, the sandwich options were more interesting than what you typically find on offer. More importantly, the long lines of customers waiting to order suggests that they are much better than the typical deli sandwich too.

As if that weren’t enough, Delimarie offers something that no other deli has: beignets.  And these are real beignets, made to order, that are almost as good as those you get in New Orleans (we believe there is a connection to that city).  We didn’t try them during our lunch time visit, but we had heard that they are excellent.  We did try the beignets at Delimarie’s West Village sister restaurant, Cafe Marie (a future review), and they did not disappoint.

Finally, Delimarie offers another option that most delis do not–a relatively quiet eating area that seats at least 25 (look for the stairs in the back of the space).  There was background music playing during our visit but the volume was low, and although every seat was taken, the chatter was more than manageable.  It wasn’t the prettiest space, but it served it’s purpose and it was clean.

If you are in the Tribeca/City Hall area and want an inexpensive, quick, and quiet nosh, head on over to Delimarie.  Just remember to save some room for the beignets!

HOURS

Monday through Saturday: 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (but buffet closes at 4:00 p.m., sandwiches at 5:00 p.m.)

Closed Sundays

LOCATION

Street (betw. Broadway and Church Street), New York, NY 10007

WEBSITE

No website

 

Square Diner — 75.3 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Located in Tribeca, Square Diner is a “classic a train-car diner” with a roof plopped on top.  Once inside, you can see its classic shape by looking up at the curved wooden ceiling.  Not only is the ceiling attractive, but we think its shape helps to diffuse sound.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

The interior is fairly small and narrow, and every square inch is used. With the exception of the ceiling, most of the other materials in the space are hard, reflective surfaces–glass, tile, and metal. The kitchen is somewhat exposed to the dining space, as there is a short order window behind the counter and a door to kitchen was propped open.  Fortunately kitchen sounds weren’t a problem during our visit. Unfortunately, background music was playing which served no purpose other than to annoy. Featuring 80’s hits–a perennial favorite–all it did was add an unnecessary layer of noise. If the music was turned off, we think the reading would have been below 73 dBC.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Still, the soundscape was definitely manageable, even with a fairly full house of chatty customers.  Without the music, we think it could have been close to comfortable. That said, the space didn’t feel too live, but since Square Diner is small, be advised that one or two loud people could easily dominate the soundscape.

No surprise that Square Diner offers a long menu of diner classics. The food is fine for what it is–Joe Jr’s has the city’s best diner burger, while this one was perfectly acceptable. Diners, particularly standalone diners, are a dying breed in New York City, so if you enjoy them, this one should be on your short list. Square Diner is a good inexpensive option in otherwise expensive and loud Tribeca.

HOURS

Monday through Friday: 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday: 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Street (at the corner of Varick Street), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Square Diner

Maman (Tribeca) — 76 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

We stopped by Maman’s Tribeca location for a quick nosh one Friday afternoon. This location of the Maman mini-chain is open for breakfast and lunch only.  It’s a pretty space, but we got the worse seat in the house–at the counter looking into the kitchen. We understand the aesthetic reasons for an open kitchen–there is a bit of spectacle in watching the chefs prepare your meal–but it also is a really efficient way to introduce high-pitched china-meeting-stainless countertop and mechanical sounds into the dining space.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Fortunately, the kitchen sounds were the only obvious source of unpleasant noise.  Otherwise the space, which was half full during our visit, was fine, despite the competing conversations. There was background music, which, though unnecessary, was playing at a volume low enough so as not to affect the soundscape.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

The space is pretty, and the Maman name is well regarded, so we were surprised by the less than fabulous Croque “Maman,” the predominant ingredient of which was the bechamel sauce.  No one likes a dry Croque Monsieur, of course, but this was drowning in sauce. Because of their reputation and user reivews, we chalked it up to an off day.  Given that quiet places are hard to find in Tribeca, Maman is an acceptable option.

HOURS

Monday through Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Can purchase items to go an hour earlier each day and until 6:00 p.m.

LOCATION

(betw. Franklin and White Streets), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Maman

Nancy Whiskey Pub — 86.4 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

When we entered Nancy Whiskey Pub we wanted to love it.  It appears to be the perfect neighborhood dive bar–not contrived or styled, it simply is a place you go to drink with your buddies.  And we did fall in love with the place, for five, maybe ten minutes. But after our brief love affair, things quickly turned ugly when a bartender began feeding bills into the jukebox and destroyed what had been a lovely relaxed atmosphere.

No one asked the bartender to play music, so either management requires the bartenders to turn it on at a certain time or maybe she was bored.  We don’t know.  What we do know is that the volume was punishing.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

We also don’t know if deafening music is played every day or whether the bartender just wanted to hear some tunes, but when we asked if the volume could be lowered, the bartender shouted, “go upstairs,” which we understood to be “no.”

We did go upstairs and found a smaller space crammed with people who were not quite drunk and already screaming–not surprisingly, this space was only slightly quieter than below. We threw back our drinks and left, emerging onto the comparatively serene street, and continued our search for the perfect bar.

So, sadly, we must advise that you avoid Nancy Whiskey Pub if you cherish your hearing more than finding a genuine neighborhood bar. The prices were good, the physical space  was perfect, but it’s just too damn loud.

HOURS

11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. every day (sometimes close earlier on Sundays and Mondays)

LOCATION

Street (on the corner of 6th Avenue), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Nancy Whiskey Pub

 

 

Pearl River Mart — 65.6 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Pearl River Mart’s Soho store was a New York City institution. Why was? Because like many longstanding and fabulous shops, their landlord demanded a criminal increase in rent and they were forced to leave. Well, they’re back!

Pearl River Mart’s new space isn’t nearly as big as the old location, so there is a smaller selection of the Chinese clothing, kitchen ware, gifts, tchotchkes and the like on offer.  As a result, instead of spending hours poring through the store, you can look at everything in far less time.  While it’s disappointing that Pearl River Mart has had to limit their inventory, it still is a good place to find inexpensive gifts and interesting housewares, and we are happy that it’s back.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Pearl River Mart’s former location was a pretty relaxed place to shop. and we are happy to tell you that the new location is too.  Classical piano played softly in the background during our weekend visit.  The place was busy but not packed; there was some chatter but it wasn’t distracting.  Overall we had a pleasant shopping experience, which isn’t a given in Manhattan.

A sea of calm on otherwise loud and busy Broadway, Pearl River Mart is well worth a visit.  Go!

HOURS

10:00 a.m. to 7:20 p.m. everyday

LOCATION

(at Walker Street), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Pearl River

Walker’s — 72.6 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Walker’s is a longstanding neighborhood bar and restaurant in Tribeca–the go to place for nearby residents.  Despite Tribeca’s reputation as an exclusive neighborhood favored by celebrities, Walker’s is definitely not a place where you would expect to find a scene.  Rather, it’s the place you go with family and friends to enjoy good renditions of American staples–soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches, brunch favorites, and hearty pasta, steak, and seafood entrees.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Walker’s has three distinct spaces.  It would be best to avoid the front room if there is a game on.  While it’s the biggest space, It’s also where the bar is located and there are a couple of flat screen tvs.  If there’s an important game we are sure it will be very loud.  That said, while it was noisier when we arrived, it was pretty mellow when we left.

Walker’s also has two narrow dining spaces, and they are usually much quieter than the bar area.  Our visit during a crowded Saturday brunch was pretty pleasant even with a screaming baby (the screaming, fortunately, was short-lived).  Music played in the background, but it wasn’t too loud.  Despite the crowd–and the occasional fuss–the space was perfectly fine and we enjoyed our visit.   Recommended.

HOURS

11:00 a.m. to 3:45 a.m. every day

LOCATION

Street (at the corner of Varick), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Walker’s

Khe-Yo — 65.6 decibels

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

What a lovely place!  Khe-Yo offers “Laotian-inspired Southeast Asian cuisine” in the heart of Tribeca.  It wasn’t very crowded when we arrived for a Tuesday lunch, and was mostly empty by the time we left.  So while the reading suggests that it was absolutely serene, please keep in mind that  Khe-Yo will be louder when full.

That said, Khe-Yo has a balance of hard and soft surfaces.  The wood floors are unfinished and the brick walls are not sealed, both of which could possibly absorb some sound, something that isn’t likely with more highly finished surfaces.  Fabric wall hangings are placed around the main dining area, and they probably helped to abate sound–they surely didn’t reflect it.  Upholstered banquettes circled the room, adding yet another relatively soft surface.

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

There was music was playing in the background during our visit.  It was at a perfect volume–loud enough to recognize what was playing but not so loud as to force people to scream over it–and the choice of music was neither jarring nor inappropriate.

We enjoyed our meal, and our Vietnamese coffees–one hot, one iced–were first rate.  Khe-yo’s space is attractive and comfortable, and we found it very relaxing.

Given the vibe of the place and the materials used in its design, we think that Khe-Yo should be tolerable even when fairly full.   You will be hard pressed to find a more relaxed, comfortable spot in Tribeca.   We were very happy with our visit and intend to return to confirm that Khe-Yo is  comfortable during dinner or brunch service.

HOURS

Monday through Wednesday: 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Thursday and Friday: 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Saturday: 12:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Sunday: 12:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Street (betw. West B’way and Hudson Street), New York, NY 10013

WEBSITE

Khe-Yo